classics

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ancient Languages & Classical Civilisation at St Augustine’s

The team    Aims of the department    Information by years    How can I help my daughter?    Career progression

Subjects Studied

  • Latin
  • Ancient Greek
  • Classical Civilisation

The Team


George Carleton – Head of Department: teacher of Latin, Greek & Classical Civilisation

Dr Carleton joined St Augustine’s Priory in 2006. Since he started, he has taught Latin from UII to LVI, Greek from LIV to Upper VI and Classical Civilisation from UIV to UVI.

Lucy Boyce – Teacher of Latin, Greek & Classical Civilisation

Ms Boyce has recently joined St Augustine’s Priory.  She studied classics at Oxford and previously taught at Benendon Girl's school for 22 years.

Gayle Gill – Teacher of Classical Civilisation

As well as being the Head of English, Dr Gill has taught Classical Civilisation from UIV to UVI, and is currently teaching Classical Civilisation in the Sixth Form.


Aims of department

Aims:

  • The aim of Classics Department is for all pupils to learn some Latin and/or Greek
  • To understand the Classical roots of much English vocabulary and grammar, and so to help pupils in their further learning of other modern European languages
  • Those pupils who study Latin and Greek to a higher level will learn to read ancient authors in the original, and develop an appreciation of the literary, historical and cultural achievements of particular ancient authors.
  • To develop an understanding of the culture and history of the ancient Mediterranean and its enduring influence on the contemporary world.

Information by years

Ages 8 - 11

In U2 pupils spend the first half of the autumn term studying the origins of the English language and learning about the different language groups within the European language family. With this background, Latin is then introduced with the aim of familiarising students with basic vocabulary, grammar and word derivations. At this stage there is reinforcement of existing knowledge of concepts such as subject and objects, as well as an introduction to further grammatical concepts underlying an ancient example of an inflected language (such as person, number, gender and case).


Ages 11 - 14

Latin
In the senior school the pace of language learning intensifies, with 3 lessons per week in the Form III (Year 7) and Lower IV, and four in Upper IV. After their introductory year in Upper II, girls moving into the Senior School are well placed to advance quickly in their Latin learning, while girls joining the school at this stage are offered the necessary help to catch up. All pupils study Latin in Form III and Lower IV, after which they can choose to study either Latin or Classical Civilisation in Upper IV.
At the end of their second term in Upper IV girls decide whether to continue studying Latin to GCSE. This course, which includes the study of ancient authors in the original language is studied over the normal two years with exams at the end of Upper V.

Ancient Greek
Greek is introduced to the girls in Lower IV (Year 8) where it is studied on a voluntary basis. After the initial challenge of learning to read and use a new alphabet the girls begin to make fairly rapid progress, since the skills required in their language learning are already firmly implanted from their study of Latin. For those girls who continue with their Greek, at the end of their second term in Upper IV (Year 9) they can opt to study the GCSE course. This course, which includes the study of ancient authors in the original is studied over the normal two years with exams at the end of Upper V.

Classical Civilisation
In Upper IV, girls who wish have the option to study Classical Civilisation instead of Latin. This is a fast moving one year course which aims to provide an introduction to certain historical and cultural topics of to do with ancient Greece and Rome. This year girls have studied modules on Greek mythology, the site of Olympia and its games, Classical Architecture and Greek theatre, as well as studying one tragedy in translation. Although this is a stand-alone course, these topics also provide a useful introduction to those girls who decide to study Classical Civilisation for GCSE, although girls who have not studied this course are also welcome to study Classical Civilisation, and have done well in it in previous years.


Ages 14 - 16


Latin   (OCR Specification J 281   http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/kd/ocr_9985_kd_spec.pdf)
At the end of Upper IV (Year 9) girls at St. Augustine's can opt to study Latin for GCSE. This GCSE is completed over the normal two years, with no controlled assessment, and includes the study of ancient texts in the original language. The students sit their exams at the end of Upper V (year 11).

Classical Greek
 (OCR Specification J 291 http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/kd/ocr_33659_kd_gcse_spec.pdf)
At the end of Upper IV (Year 9) girls who have been studying ancient Greek on a voluntary basis for one or two years can opt to continue studying this language to GCSE. This is a two year course, with no controlled assessment, and includes the study of ancient set texts in the original language. The students sit their exams at the end of Upper Y (year 11).

Classical Civilisation (OCR Specification J 280 http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/kd/ocr_9944_kd_spec.pdf)
The option of studying Classical Civilisation for GCSE is open to all Upper IV pupils (Year 9) when they make their option choices, whether or not they have already studied Classical Civilisation in Upper IV. The course comprises four modules, one which involves an extended writing task under exam conditions. All modules, including this controlled assessment, are examined are examined at the end of Upper V, while the controlled assessment can now be submitted only in the second year of study.


Classics in the Sixth Form:  Age 16 - 18 or Key Stage 5

Latin & Classical Greek
In the sixth form Latin and Classical Greek are studied to a more advanced level. In addition to more advanced language work, in both the AS and A2 years, two ancient authors are studied – one poetry author, and one prose author. For example, last year A2 Latin students studied the Cataline Conspiracy by the historian Sallust and Virgil's Aeneid, while AS Latin students studied the Verrine oratian by Cicero as well as a book from the Metamorphoses by the poet Ovid.

OCR Latin & Greek Specification:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/82461-specification.pdf

Classical Civilisation
Two modules are studied in each of the AS and A2 years in Classical Civilisation. We are currently trying to maintain a balance between Greek and Roman study areas. Current AS students are studying Homer's Odyssey and Society together with Roman Society and Thought, while the A2 students are taking Virgil and the world of the hero and a module on comedy (Comic Drama in the Ancient World). In the past other subjects have been tackled, such as Greek tragedy in its context and Archaeology: Mycenae and the Classical World, so it would be a good idea to ask subject teachers what areas the department will tackle in the coming academic year.

OCR Classical Civilisation Specification

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/82461-specification.pdf

All our AS and A2 level students studying Latin, Classical Greek and Classical Civilisation will attend conferences on many of the components of their subjects


How can I help my daughter?        

KS2

Latin
Your daughter will be studying Latin using the minimus text book. A good place to start for additional material is the minimus websight ( http://www.minimus-etc.co.uk/ ). As with all language learning, the key issue is vocabulary learning. There are many websites available if you type minimus vocabulary test into google. Alternatively you can go to quizlet.com and type minimus vocabulary test and follow the links for the many flashcards, games and vocab drills which are available; if you prefer follow this link:
http://quizlet.com/subject/minimus-vocabulary-test/

KS3

Latin
Now that your daughter is learning more Latin, you can help her especially with her vocabulary learning.

a) For those studying Latin with the So you really want to learn Latin textbook the easiest resource to use are the numerous flashcards, games and vocab drills which are available on the to quizlet.com website. Either go to quizlet.com and type So you really want to learn Latin Vocabulary and then follow the links, or use the following link;  http://quizlet.com/subject/so-you-really-want-to-learn-latin/
For those wishing to buy additional material, go to the publisher’s official website 
http://www.galorepark.co.uk/product/parents/36/so-you-really-want-to-learn-latin-book-i.html

b) For those studying Latin with the Cambridge Latin Course textbook the first place to visit is the publisher’s website at www.cambridgescp.com which has useful additional resources, as well as extra material to buy should you wish to.
(see also http://www.cambridgescp.com/Lpage.php?p=clc^oa_book1^stage1 )

In addition to this, another useful resource are the numerous flashcards, games and vocab drills which are available on the to quizlet.com website. Either go to quizlet.com and type Cambridge Latin CourseVocabulary and then follow the links, or use the following link;

http://quizlet.com/subject/cambridge-latin-course-book-1-vocabulary/


Classical Civilisation
There is such a wealth of material available that it is best to ask your teacher for guidance depending on the particular topic that you are studying. However, the following websites provide very useful material
The Perseus website is mainly a resource with ancient texts, but it has an excellent section on the Olympic Games and site of Olympia:  http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/Olympics/
A good website on Greek & Roman mythology and gods is provided by theoi.com: http://www.theoi.com/  In addition to this the Perseus website has a good section on Herakles: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/Herakles/index.html
The British Museum (http://www.ancientgreece.co.uk/)has excellent web-based resources on ancient Greece, including interactive sections on Greek theatre, the Olympic Games, Athens, Sparta and religious life.
For those researching ancient Pompeii and the eruption of Vesuvius in 79AD, an excellent place to start is provided by the website AD 79 http://sites.google.com/site/ad79eruption/

KS4

Latin
Your daughter will probably be doing an intensive one-year GCSE course. In the earlier part of the course she will encounter a lot of new vocabulary in her GCSE vocabulary word list which can seem very daunting. There are numerous websites which offer help in vocabulary learning but, once again, the easiest one to use is provided by the quizlet.com. Either go to quizlet.com and type GCSE Latin vocabulary and follow the links to their games, quizzes and flashcards, or use the following link; http://quizlet.com/subject/gcse-latin-vocabulary/
For those who prefer their Latin on the go, you can even download an APP from the Apple Store to help you with your GCSE Latin vocabulary; follow this link: http://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/gcse-latin/id383702109?mt=8

In addition to on-line resources, you might consider some additional textbooks. A good simplified version of GCSE Latin grammar with accompanying exercises is provided by Essential GCSE Latin by John Taylor. This can be useful in the final stages of revision, as are the graded translation passages in Latin Momentum Tests for GCSE by Ashley Carter. Both books are easily ordered new, or second-hand, on amazon.co.uk.

Greek
An excellent web-based resource has been produced by Eton College. Either go through google to the The Eton Greek Project, and follow the links to its vocabulary, verb, noun and adjective testers, or use the following link.
http://www.etoncollege.com/GreekProject.aspx?nid=e19484e6-707c-44d4-a3d7-f8b93df8751f
Alternatively you can use the Greek vocabulary tester for GCSE produced by getrevising.co.uk
http://getrevising.co.uk/resources/ocr_gcse_greek_vocab_tester
or you can go to quizlet.com and type GCSE Greek vocabulary and follow the links to their games, quizzes and flashcards, or you use the following link  http://quizlet.com/subject/gcse-greek-vocabulary/

Classical Civilisation
As mentioned above (KS4) there is a wealth of material. Our advice is to ask your teacher for the more useful web-based resources, and use the links provided above.

KS5

Latin
By the time your daughter has reached this level she will need to be far more of an independent learner. Of course she will still need to learn her vocabulary and an excellent site to help in this is provided by the OCR Latin vocabulary tester; www.cambridgescp.com/ws2_tlc/vocab/ocras/ocras.html . For A2 Latin students there is no prescribed vocabulary, but a good place to be getting on with is AQA A2 Latin Vocabulary Tester available at the following: www.cambridgescp.com/ws2_tlc/vocab/aqa_a2.html

However, just as with modern language learning, Latin students need to be exposing themselves to as much Latin as possible on a daily basis. This might seem to be difficult, but how about reading the excellent daily on-line newspaper written entirely in Latin available at  http://ephemeris.alcuinus.net/ ?  In addition to this you can listen (!) to the daily news in Latin, as produced by either the Finnish Broadcasting Company or by Radio Bremen in Germany. Either go through google and type news in Latin radio and follow the link produced by Pro Latin ( http://www.prolatein.de/latinnews.html ), or go directly using either of the two links below; for those who don’t know German, the first site is easier to follow.
http://www.yle.fi/fbc/latini
http://www.radio-bremen.de/online/latein/index.html

For those wishing to buy additional written resources, many pupils have found Latin Unseens for A level by Ashley Carter a useful book to work from. Alternatively, just ask your teacher !

Greek
Once again, the best web-based resource for helping with Classical Greek vocabulary and grammar is provided by Eton College. Either go through google to the The Eton Greek Project, and follow the links to its AS level resources, or use the following link;  http://www.etoncollege.com/OCRASWordList.aspx


Career progression

There is no prescribed career path for those students who have studied Classics in any of its forms, although people have been trained in the rigors of learning a classical language or who have studied ancient authors are often to be found in professions such law, journalism and medicine. Above all, these are disciplines that are respected both at university and in the world beyond education.